Eat and Get Drunk

In Chinese, the phrase “Eat and get drunk” (fan zui) is a homophone of “commit crime,” which makes the phrase really eye-catching. Dozens and sometimes hundreds of people come together for these events.
Of course people do not come together only to eat and drink. They have one common wish: To talk and share. They talk about politics and social issues. They discuss abolishing “re-education through labor,” forced evictions, education on the countryside, the East Turkistan issue, etc. The movement’s main initiator, Li Huaping, has said, “We embrace freedom, justice, and love.” And the first time people come to “eat and get drunk” they are strangers, the second time they make friends, and later they become comrades.

Continue reading this column on Sampsonia Way Magazine.

Eat and Get Drunk

In Chinese, the phrase “Eat and get drunk” (fan zui) is a homophone of “commit crime,” which makes the phrase really eye-catching. Dozens and sometimes hundreds of people come together for these events.

Of course people do not come together only to eat and drink. They have one common wish: To talk and share. They talk about politics and social issues. They discuss abolishing “re-education through labor,” forced evictions, education on the countryside, the East Turkistan issue, etc. The movement’s main initiator, Li Huaping, has said, “We embrace freedom, justice, and love.” And the first time people come to “eat and get drunk” they are strangers, the second time they make friends, and later they become comrades.

Continue reading this column on Sampsonia Way Magazine.

Andrew Jacobs: Telling the World About China

You cannot make homicidal maniac films, you cannot make zombie films, you cannot make the world-is-coming-to-an-end films that touch on evil, corrupt governments. All those topics make the Communist Party nervous and there are a lot of frustrated filmmakers in the country. There are certain subjects that just cannot be filmed. For example, you can’t even make time travel films because it may take you back to an area of history that might make the government look bad. But to that end, I do think that China’s policies are harmful in the long run. Those policies damage its cultural capital, its international soft power, and its image around the world. 

Continue reading this exclusive interview on Sampsonia Way Magazine.

Andrew Jacobs: Telling the World About China

You cannot make homicidal maniac films, you cannot make zombie films, you cannot make the world-is-coming-to-an-end films that touch on evil, corrupt governments. All those topics make the Communist Party nervous and there are a lot of frustrated filmmakers in the country. There are certain subjects that just cannot be filmed. For example, you can’t even make time travel films because it may take you back to an area of history that might make the government look bad. But to that end, I do think that China’s policies are harmful in the long run. Those policies damage its cultural capital, its international soft power, and its image around the world. 

Continue reading this exclusive interview on Sampsonia Way Magazine.

Melong Band: When Tibet Rocks!

To really remember where you are originally from. Preserve your cultural background and be informed about what’s really happening in Tibet. That is the most important thing to think about: What’s happening in Tibet and how can we stop the killing of Tibetan people? So far there have been 119 cases of self-immolation since 2009, but it’s still happening. The youngest one was sixteen years old. We want our youngsters to be educated: Keep on studying and learn how you can help in the future of Tibet.

Continue reading this interview on Sampsonia Way Magazine.

Melong Band: When Tibet Rocks!

To really remember where you are originally from. Preserve your cultural background and be informed about what’s really happening in Tibet. That is the most important thing to think about: What’s happening in Tibet and how can we stop the killing of Tibetan people? So far there have been 119 cases of self-immolation since 2009, but it’s still happening. The youngest one was sixteen years old. We want our youngsters to be educated: Keep on studying and learn how you can help in the future of Tibet.

Continue reading this interview on Sampsonia Way Magazine.

Interview with Tienchi Martin-Liao, Independent Chinese PEN Centre President

I don’t have fear, but I do have hatred, I do have enemies. I hate this oppression, and I hate the system, and the system is made by people. I hate those who deprive my colleagues and friends their freedom of expression and basic human rights. I not only hate them, I try to fight against them. But as for my person, I really don’t have any fear.

Continue reading this interview at Sampsonia Way Magazine.

Interview with Tienchi Martin-Liao, Independent Chinese PEN Centre President

I don’t have fear, but I do have hatred, I do have enemies. I hate this oppression, and I hate the system, and the system is made by people. I hate those who deprive my colleagues and friends their freedom of expression and basic human rights. I not only hate them, I try to fight against them. But as for my person, I really don’t have any fear.

Continue reading this interview at Sampsonia Way Magazine.

Excerpt: Liao Yiwu’s For a Song and a Hundred Songs

Sampsonia Way presents an exclusive excerpt from Liao Yiwu’s not-yet-published book, For a Song and a Hundred Songs. The book, which won the German Book Trade’s Peace Prize last fall, chronicles his arrest and time in prison for criticizing the Chinese government. 
This excerpt details Liao’s 1990 arrest and the CCP’s subsequent arrests of the poets, artists, and intellectuals in Liao’s circle of friends.

Continue reading this excerpt at Sampsonia Way Magazine.

Excerpt: Liao Yiwu’s For a Song and a Hundred Songs

Sampsonia Way presents an exclusive excerpt from Liao Yiwu’s not-yet-published book, For a Song and a Hundred Songs. The book, which won the German Book Trade’s Peace Prize last fall, chronicles his arrest and time in prison for criticizing the Chinese government. 

This excerpt details Liao’s 1990 arrest and the CCP’s subsequent arrests of the poets, artists, and intellectuals in Liao’s circle of friends.


Continue reading this excerpt at Sampsonia Way Magazine.