Eat and Get Drunk

In Chinese, the phrase “Eat and get drunk” (fan zui) is a homophone of “commit crime,” which makes the phrase really eye-catching. Dozens and sometimes hundreds of people come together for these events.
Of course people do not come together only to eat and drink. They have one common wish: To talk and share. They talk about politics and social issues. They discuss abolishing “re-education through labor,” forced evictions, education on the countryside, the East Turkistan issue, etc. The movement’s main initiator, Li Huaping, has said, “We embrace freedom, justice, and love.” And the first time people come to “eat and get drunk” they are strangers, the second time they make friends, and later they become comrades.

Continue reading this column on Sampsonia Way Magazine.

Eat and Get Drunk

In Chinese, the phrase “Eat and get drunk” (fan zui) is a homophone of “commit crime,” which makes the phrase really eye-catching. Dozens and sometimes hundreds of people come together for these events.

Of course people do not come together only to eat and drink. They have one common wish: To talk and share. They talk about politics and social issues. They discuss abolishing “re-education through labor,” forced evictions, education on the countryside, the East Turkistan issue, etc. The movement’s main initiator, Li Huaping, has said, “We embrace freedom, justice, and love.” And the first time people come to “eat and get drunk” they are strangers, the second time they make friends, and later they become comrades.

Continue reading this column on Sampsonia Way Magazine.

Melong Band: When Tibet Rocks!

To really remember where you are originally from. Preserve your cultural background and be informed about what’s really happening in Tibet. That is the most important thing to think about: What’s happening in Tibet and how can we stop the killing of Tibetan people? So far there have been 119 cases of self-immolation since 2009, but it’s still happening. The youngest one was sixteen years old. We want our youngsters to be educated: Keep on studying and learn how you can help in the future of Tibet.

Continue reading this interview on Sampsonia Way Magazine.

Melong Band: When Tibet Rocks!

To really remember where you are originally from. Preserve your cultural background and be informed about what’s really happening in Tibet. That is the most important thing to think about: What’s happening in Tibet and how can we stop the killing of Tibetan people? So far there have been 119 cases of self-immolation since 2009, but it’s still happening. The youngest one was sixteen years old. We want our youngsters to be educated: Keep on studying and learn how you can help in the future of Tibet.

Continue reading this interview on Sampsonia Way Magazine.

Journalist in a Dawning Country

I had been away from Myanmar since December 2007—nearly five years—when I made the decision to return.
I knew that every part of my return would prove challenging, but I needed to go back to Myanmar. My home is my home and as a journalist, I knew I should be inside, with my people and their news. If I weren’t there, my life would become meaningless.
Still, as a journalist, I needed to be able to write what I wanted, when I wanted to write it. I expected my country’s situation to be different than before—everything is changing, and I will talk about that—but first I need to explain why I left Myanmar.

Continue reading this column on Sampsonia Way Magazine.

Journalist in a Dawning Country

I had been away from Myanmar since December 2007—nearly five years—when I made the decision to return.

I knew that every part of my return would prove challenging, but I needed to go back to Myanmar. My home is my home and as a journalist, I knew I should be inside, with my people and their news. If I weren’t there, my life would become meaningless.

Still, as a journalist, I needed to be able to write what I wanted, when I wanted to write it. I expected my country’s situation to be different than before—everything is changing, and I will talk about that—but first I need to explain why I left Myanmar.

Continue reading this column on Sampsonia Way Magazine.

Art to Die For: Cartoonists at Risk and Their Defenders
Cartoonists Rights Network International (CRNI) was the first cartoon-focused human rights organization when it was founded in 1992. Created by Sri Lankan cartoonist Jiffry Yoonis and development consultant Robert Russell, CRNI collaborates with a network of cartoonists from around the world. These affiliates keep the organization informed on what is happening to their colleagues in their respective countries. Sampsonia Way spoke to co-founder Robert Russell and four of CRNI’s affiliates, located in the most dangerous countries for political artists. In this series we present these affiliates and a slideshow of cartoons from their country.
Read the series on Sampsonia Way Magazine.

Art to Die For: Cartoonists at Risk and Their Defenders

Cartoonists Rights Network International (CRNI) was the first cartoon-focused human rights organization when it was founded in 1992. Created by Sri Lankan cartoonist Jiffry Yoonis and development consultant Robert Russell, CRNI collaborates with a network of cartoonists from around the world. These affiliates keep the organization informed on what is happening to their colleagues in their respective countries. Sampsonia Way spoke to co-founder Robert Russell and four of CRNI’s affiliates, located in the most dangerous countries for political artists. In this series we present these affiliates and a slideshow of cartoons from their country.

Read the series on Sampsonia Way Magazine.

Bangladeshi Cartoonist Arifur Rahman on Calling a Cat “Mohammad”

From 2007 to 2010 I lived in danger in Bangladesh. Radical Muslims felt that I had insulted Muhammad and Islam, and I was tortured several times both inside and outside of jail; I also received lots of death threats. I do not think it is any more or less dangerous now than it was then.

Continue reading this interview at Sampsonia Way Magazine.

Bangladeshi Cartoonist Arifur Rahman on Calling a Cat “Mohammad”

From 2007 to 2010 I lived in danger in Bangladesh. Radical Muslims felt that I had insulted Muhammad and Islam, and I was tortured several times both inside and outside of jail; I also received lots of death threats. I do not think it is any more or less dangerous now than it was then.

Continue reading this interview at Sampsonia Way Magazine.