Sampsonia Way

Jul 04

Turkish Spring Despite Police Violence and Censured Media

Police violence against the demonstrations has come in waves for weeks. In late May a young woman in red became the symbol of the peaceful pro-green and pro-democracy protests when video of a police officer violently attempting to remove her from Gezi Park was released. After hiding her identity for a few days, she revealed that she was an academic and re-emphasized her support in the struggle for democratization.
Over the course of these protests thousands of us have been brutally harmed by the police. Many have broken an arm or other limb. Some have lost an eye from the rubber bullets and tear gas canisters that the police have misused. More than “just a few” demonstrators have been killed.

Continue reading this column on Sampsonia Way Magazine.

Turkish Spring Despite Police Violence and Censured Media

Police violence against the demonstrations has come in waves for weeks. In late May a young woman in red became the symbol of the peaceful pro-green and pro-democracy protests when video of a police officer violently attempting to remove her from Gezi Park was released. After hiding her identity for a few days, she revealed that she was an academic and re-emphasized her support in the struggle for democratization.

Over the course of these protests thousands of us have been brutally harmed by the police. Many have broken an arm or other limb. Some have lost an eye from the rubber bullets and tear gas canisters that the police have misused. More than “just a few” demonstrators have been killed.

Continue reading this column on Sampsonia Way Magazine.

Journalist in a Dawning Country

I had been away from Myanmar since December 2007—nearly five years—when I made the decision to return.
I knew that every part of my return would prove challenging, but I needed to go back to Myanmar. My home is my home and as a journalist, I knew I should be inside, with my people and their news. If I weren’t there, my life would become meaningless.
Still, as a journalist, I needed to be able to write what I wanted, when I wanted to write it. I expected my country’s situation to be different than before—everything is changing, and I will talk about that—but first I need to explain why I left Myanmar.

Continue reading this column on Sampsonia Way Magazine.

Journalist in a Dawning Country

I had been away from Myanmar since December 2007—nearly five years—when I made the decision to return.

I knew that every part of my return would prove challenging, but I needed to go back to Myanmar. My home is my home and as a journalist, I knew I should be inside, with my people and their news. If I weren’t there, my life would become meaningless.

Still, as a journalist, I needed to be able to write what I wanted, when I wanted to write it. I expected my country’s situation to be different than before—everything is changing, and I will talk about that—but first I need to explain why I left Myanmar.

Continue reading this column on Sampsonia Way Magazine.

Egypt’s Writers Call for the Impeachment of Morsi 

On the morning of June 21, after an impromptu meeting at the Egyptian Writers Union (EWU)—which is only a few blocks away from the Egyptian Ministry of Culture—the members of the EWU voted on a measure to withdraw the union’s confidence from president Morsi and call for early presidential elections and the creation of a nationally unified government. The EWU also intended to demand the drafting of a new constitution that reflects the national consensus.

Continue reading this column on Sampsonia Way Magazine.

Egypt’s Writers Call for the Impeachment of Morsi 

On the morning of June 21, after an impromptu meeting at the Egyptian Writers Union (EWU)—which is only a few blocks away from the Egyptian Ministry of Culture—the members of the EWU voted on a measure to withdraw the union’s confidence from president Morsi and call for early presidential elections and the creation of a nationally unified government. The EWU also intended to demand the drafting of a new constitution that reflects the national consensus.

Continue reading this column on Sampsonia Way Magazine.

Art to Die For: Cartoonists at Risk and Their Defenders
Cartoonists Rights Network International (CRNI) was the first cartoon-focused human rights organization when it was founded in 1992. Created by Sri Lankan cartoonist Jiffry Yoonis and development consultant Robert Russell, CRNI collaborates with a network of cartoonists from around the world. These affiliates keep the organization informed on what is happening to their colleagues in their respective countries. Sampsonia Way spoke to co-founder Robert Russell and four of CRNI’s affiliates, located in the most dangerous countries for political artists. In this series we present these affiliates and a slideshow of cartoons from their country.
Read the series on Sampsonia Way Magazine.

Art to Die For: Cartoonists at Risk and Their Defenders

Cartoonists Rights Network International (CRNI) was the first cartoon-focused human rights organization when it was founded in 1992. Created by Sri Lankan cartoonist Jiffry Yoonis and development consultant Robert Russell, CRNI collaborates with a network of cartoonists from around the world. These affiliates keep the organization informed on what is happening to their colleagues in their respective countries. Sampsonia Way spoke to co-founder Robert Russell and four of CRNI’s affiliates, located in the most dangerous countries for political artists. In this series we present these affiliates and a slideshow of cartoons from their country.

Read the series on Sampsonia Way Magazine.

Jun 17

Guatemala: From an Overturned Conviction to a Surprising Extradition

There is a huge difference between the two—not just because one is military and the other a civilian, but because the nature of their crimes is also different. Portillo is accused of being a shameless thief who took advantage of his time in office as the president of Guatemala to steal millions and launder the money abroad. Sure, this is a fairly common occurrence in Latin America, but that certainly does not excuse or justify it. The case of Ríos Montt is qualitatively different: He was a military officer who, as head of state, sent the national armed forces to murder tens of thousands of defenseless, indigenous Mayan people. His trial and sentencing had tremendous symbolic importance, both for the implementation of justice and as reparation for the survivors and victims of the genocide.

Continue reading this column at Sampsonia Way Magazine.

Guatemala: From an Overturned Conviction to a Surprising Extradition

There is a huge difference between the two—not just because one is military and the other a civilian, but because the nature of their crimes is also different. Portillo is accused of being a shameless thief who took advantage of his time in office as the president of Guatemala to steal millions and launder the money abroad. Sure, this is a fairly common occurrence in Latin America, but that certainly does not excuse or justify it. The case of Ríos Montt is qualitatively different: He was a military officer who, as head of state, sent the national armed forces to murder tens of thousands of defenseless, indigenous Mayan people. His trial and sentencing had tremendous symbolic importance, both for the implementation of justice and as reparation for the survivors and victims of the genocide.

Continue reading this column at Sampsonia Way Magazine.